Weird Human of the Week

Weird . . . we’re everywhere! What makes us weird? When did we decide it was weird? How does our weird serve others? Read on . . .

Marie-Elizabeth Mali, relationship alchemist

“I was raised in New York between three cultures—American, Venezuelan, and Swedish—and spoke Spanish, Swedish and English by the age of three. I’ve always had a sense of being an outsider because everywhere I went only part of me was represented there. I became hyper-concerned with belonging and blending in, until I realized that I kept losing myself in the process, so I shifted to finding belonging within instead, which freed my weird.”

Weird Girl of the Week

Tricia Brouk, award-winning director

“I am a creature of habit. My routine allows me to be an extremely high performer and creator. And I love animals. I have two cats, Lola and Bella. They are Maine Coons, so they have very loving personalities and act like dogs. Greeting me at the door, playing catch and answering me when I ask them questions. I will also make out with dogs being walked on the street. I feel that I can empathize with animals as easily as I can with humans.”

Weird Girl of the Week

Laura Gassner Otting, media personality

“I went to computer sleep away camp when I was 12, I once ran a 5k in a Wonder Woman bustier, and I’ve never not been turned on by the audacity of a gigantic hare-brained adventure. Also, I’m deathly afraid of being swallowed whole by a whale and having to make my life inside of its belly. When your signature personality traits turn out to be your best cocktail party punchlines, you realize you aren’t normal. But, good lord, normal is boring. This little light of mine… I’m gonna let it shine. You know what’s cool? Shining your weird light on other people’s weird acts as a spotlight on glitter. We don’t just shine, we all sparkle.”


Weird Girl of the Week

Sarah Elkins, storytelling coach

“I’m bossy. But I’m not, really, it’s that I just know things and rarely hesitate to share what I know. I’ve been called controlling, but I don’t care what other people do unless they ask me for help or offer to help me. That’s not controlling, is it? I never felt like I was aggressive in any way, so it seemed weird when my mom or another authority figure would call me controlling or bossy. I’m little, only 5’2, and have always been super friendly – I love people! It seemed like a major contradiction to my size and how I perceived myself.”

Weird Girl of the Week

Kate MacKinnon, Feng Shui expert

“I was a STEM girl way before the term was coined, feminist in the 70s, working in technology when there were few women. Rather than retire from corporate, I transitioned to taking my side career, Feng Shui, to a full-on, full-time business, and at 65 talking about women, aging and visibility. Looking back, most of the way I have lived my life has not been the norm, even though I have thought of myself as a conventional girl on many levels, and certainly raised that way, but I have rarely made the conventional choices.”

Cher Jones

“My weird is my ability to create connections between random thoughts, sentences, experiences and make them makes sense. It happens at the weirdest times. Somebody will say something and all of a sudden I think of a song lyric, a movie scene or an old commercial And for whatever reason I’m able to connect the random pop culture references to the conversation.”


Weird Girl of the Week

Dr. Sweta Chakraborty, behavioral scientist

Rahaf Harfoush

Weird Girl of the Week

Keiya Rayne


Weird Girl of the Week

Jeanette Bronee

Weird Girl of the Week

Kate Volman

Weird Girl of the Week

Dr. Erin Baker


Weird Girl of the Week

Monica Van Landingham

Weird Girl of the Week

Denise Hamilton

Weird Girl of the Week

Tamsen Webster


Kimberly Davis

Meredith Grundei, New York-based speaker coach, actor, director